Don't Starve - 10 Realistic Survival Games That Truly Test Your Might

Intro

Intro

one of the best elements of a survival game is how real it feels. A lot of that comes from grounding certain elements of the game in something that you might see in the real world, and a lot of the time, that also means making it tough. Hi folks, it's Falcon and today on GameRanks are 10 realistic survival games that truly test your endurance , starting off with number 10.

Green hell

It's green hell. Green Hell is basically the platonic ideal of what a realistic survival game is; there's nothing fantastical about it. Think about it. It's just you against the elements. Seriously, there are a lot of nasty status effects that come down in this game. If you don't boil water, you can get a parasitic infection; you can get scratches and abrasions from falling long heights; if you're moving through water sources, leeches can cling to your skin; and you can even get a rash if you come into contact with certain insects like ants and wasps.

A big part of the gameplay of Green Hell is learning how to deal with the various ailments you're basically unable to avoid while traveling through the jungle. It's all these little things that won't necessarily kill you, but they can build up and really mess you up in the long run. Sanity is another important part of the game.

All these illnesses can slowly erode your sanity, and if you can't do things to make yourself feel safe and healthy, you will just straight up lose the will to live. Of course, the game still has all your standard survival game elements like building a shelter, hunting animals, and there are even hostile Amazonian tribesmen you encounter, but for the most part, this game's about dealing with the more mundane parts of survival, which adds a real layer of realism and challenge to the entire experience.

Medieval dynasty

Medieval dynasty

And Number nine is the Medieval Dynasty. Here's a game that's very different from Green Hell but is realistic in its own way. Instead of being a lone survivor trapped in an unfamiliar place, you play as a guy who leaves his war-torn home to travel north to someplace safer and to start a new life in a verdant valley.

You're not alone here at all, and, in fact, the entire point of the game is to create your own dynasty. Of course, as is standard in these types of games, you basically start out with just the clothes on your back, and from there you build up an entire settlement. You can build houses to attract new people to join your town.

You can hunt. You can trade with already established settlements. And you can follow a fairly elaborate storyline that's part tutorial, part RPG questline. Medieval Dynasty is more streamlined in its survival mechanics compared to a lot of other games on this list, but what makes it so interesting is how you create your own village and all the mechanics around it.

It's a little bit more forgiving in terms of survival than something like Green Hell, but that's because the survival of your main character isn't the only thing you have to worry about. You have an entire town to think about, and that wrinkle makes this game a really interesting entry in the survival genre.

Ancestors: the humankind odyssey

Ancestors: the humankind odyssey

And number eight is our ancestors, humankind. Odyssey: Say what you want about this one, but it's definitely a unique ancestor of humankind. Odyssey is a very dense and complex game that can very easily become frustrating.

But there's really nothing else like it out there. This is a game where your goal is nothing less than the evolution of mankind. You start out as an ape-like proto-human in the prehistoric past, and your goal is to gain knowledge, learn skills, and pass all that on to the next generation, so eventually you become human.

It's a very ambitious idea, and that ambition can be seen in the entire game because this thing plays like no other game I've ever seen. I don't think I've ever seen a game with a knowledge button before. For instance, what makes this game so tough, especially at first, is that you're pretty much starting at square one.

Your ape guy knows pretty much nothing about the world, and the game does very little to explain anything to you. This one definitely had a mixed response, first because it can be really unforgiving, which makes sense. You're playing as a wild animal, and it's a doggy dog, but even compared to many other survival games, it can be hard to figure out what you're even supposed to do in this one because of how unique its controls are. The Humankind odyssey isn't for everyone, but there's a lot of interesting stuff going on with it and it deserves a shout out at least.

Project zomboid

Project zomboid

And number seven is Project Zomboid. Here's a game that has been in early access for what feels like forever, but the developers keep plugging away at it and making improvements.

They add new scenarios. The premise itself isn't realistic. It's a zombie survival game, and obviously zombies don't exist, but what makes this game so great is that it takes the premise and tries to make it as realistic as possible, which is a long way to say that you're basically screwed. This game is tough, like incredibly tough.

Just managing to stay alive for a few days feels like a big accomplishment. You play as a lone survivor at the very beginning of a zombie apocalypse, and the goal is to simply survive, which is much easier said than done. The zombies are relentless in this game, and it only takes a few of them to take you down at close range.

Encounters are incredibly tense because it doesn't just take a bite to kill you; just a simple scratch can lead to long-term problems for you, especially with medical supplies being so rare. Project Zomboid's graphics are very basic, sure, but the simulation is incredibly in-depth. All this to say is that dying is pretty much inevitable in Project Zomboid. It's not very pretty to look at, but it's complex and in-depth systems make it probably the most realistic zombie game out there.

Unreal world

Unreal world

And number six is an unreal world. One of the kings of the survival genre, is a strange and very old-school experience that's beloved by many for its simulation elements.

In a lot of ways, the game is basically a dwarf fortress combined with a survival game. That's the level of intense simulation we're talking about here. When you start out, your chosen character is dropped into an entirely simulated, fictional world. It's a fantasy, but don't expect a lot of fantastical elements, especially at first, because this is an in-depth survival experience where just doing something basic like catching a squirrel is a challenging experience.

The interface definitely takes some getting used to. To call it archaic would be an understatement, but once you get the hang of the unusual controls, it eventually starts to make at least a certain amount of sense. You can hunt, build a settlement, become a tradesman, a fisherman, or even a warrior.

Author:
Source
Similar articles: